Publications

How and In What Ways Did Standards-Based Reform Address Structural Inequities in Education? Evidence Synthesis Series-RQ1

The Standards-Based Reform (SBR) movement has shaped current debates in the United States about public education, educators’ practices, and student outcomes. Past research on SBR assessed what worked well and lessons learned over time. This evidence synthesis is the first in a three-part series that builds upon previous research by examining SBR successes and challenges, evaluating progress in addressing educational inequities, and outlining bright spots. As policymakers and education leaders consider the future direction of federal accountability policy, they will need to closely examine the unintended consequences and pushbacks presented in this synthesis and think through policy implementation scenarios from multiple frameworks including systems change, human behavior, and anti-racism. Systems do not change unless incentives are sufficiently motivating and potential consequences do not disproportionately impact schools that serve majority low-income students and/or students of color.

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What Equitable Approaches Have Been Taken To Address The Unintended Consequences of SBR?
Evidence Synthesis Series - RQ3

Whereas the first two syntheses relied on systematic literature review and meta-analysis methods, the third report is a landscape scan of districts that were previously identified by their states as low performing, but are now showing positive academic shifts for students of color and students experiencing poverty. Moreover, these districts are engaging in intentional equity work to address the unintended consequences or equity challenges that emerged during SBR. This landscape scan of equity drivers is valuable because it demonstrates that there are districts actively communicating to the school community that equity is a priority. It is a snapshot of districts that are planning, if not actively, working to address educational inequities. The National Academies Press educational equity indicators were used to frame and organize the findings. 

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Chicago Latino Needs Assessment: Opportunities to Invest in Children and Youth  - Data Brief

To understand the unique context of the seven predominantly Latino communities in Chicago, we began by examining data trends across four key topics —  population and demographics, social and economic conditions, health outcomes, and crime and violence.  We also  examined publicly available education data (K-12 and postsecondary) to understand the educational landscape as well as education options available for children in the seven communities. 

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In Pursuit of Racial Equity: A Pathway for Action and Transformation in Education - White Paper

This report highlights the current state of educational inequities and national efforts to address them through policy, resources, tools, and technical assistance. EduDream reviewed 60+ equity-centered resources, we find that few toolkits are explicitly designed for K-12 schools and districts. 

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What Were the Unintended Consequences of Standards-Based Reform, Particularly on Students of Color?
Evidence Synthesis Series - RQ2

For decades, the Standards-Based Reform (SBR) movement informed education policy in the United States. But the hyper focus on assessments and accountability had negative and unintended consequences on schools and districts, particularly those serving primarily Black, Latinx, and low-income students. As a result, SBR faced pushback from families, communities, teachers, and policymakers. This second synthesis  provides additional relevant evidence-based insights on the equity challenges highlighted in the first synthesis. As policymakers and education leaders consider the future direction of federal accountability policy, they will need to closely examine the unintended consequences and pushbacks presented in this synthesis and think through policy implementation scenarios from multiple frameworks including systems change, human behavior, and anti-racism. Systems do not change unless incentives are sufficiently motivating and potential consequences do not disproportionately impact schools that serve majority low-income students and/or students of color.

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Chicago Latino Needs Assessment: Opportunities to Invest in Children and Youth  - Executive Summary

For Chicago to remain an economic powerhouse, Latinos must prosper through quality educational experiences, community programming, postsecondary and career training, and employment opportunities that provide livable wages. In other words, a college and career ready workforce will be essential to the city’s future. Building a college and career ready workforce begins with meeting community residents’ social, emotional and educational needs. A comprehensive needs assessment is a first step in assessing the educational needs and opportunities in a community. Findings from the needs assessment address five main areas: 1) Understanding Latino families; 2) Community Assets; 3) Challenges for Latino Families; 4) Educational Needs of Children; and 5) Youth Basic Needs of Children and Youth.

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Chicago Latino Needs Assessment: Opportunities to Invest in Children and Youth  - Community Voices

This report presents findings from deep dives into three focus communities: Chicago Lawn, Little Village, and South Chicago. The findings emerged from in-depth data collection from 79 community stakeholders including community leaders, educators and parents.  

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